10:00 am – 11:00 am

Moderator:

Ethan Rutherford

Panelists:

Lilly Dancyger

Graphic/Illustrated Storytelling

Panel Abstract

11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Moderator:

Anthony D’Aries

Panelists:

Charles Coe
Molly Gaudry

What’s Real May Not Be: Fact, Fiction, and Cross-Genre Play

Memoirists are often asked if any part of their work is fictionalized. The speaker of a poem is often conflated with the poet. Many novels–particularly first novels–are at least partially autobiographical, and some others take place along alternative historical timelines, tell the dramatized stories of real-life historical figures, or take place in steampunk or dark fantasy universes formed from the substance of history and truth mixed with the imaginativity of fantasy. But what happens between writer and reader–between the real world and the story of a poem, a piece of creative nonfiction, or a work of fiction–when authors either intentionally or–we assume–blur that line between fact and fiction? Do we expect more “honesty”–more “truth”–from memoir and poetry in comparison to fiction? Do we think that some genres have “more to say” because of their proximity to history or to contemporary events? And what do we mean by “fact” and “fiction” in the first place?

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Moderator:

Ines Riveria

Panelists:

Benjamin Grossberg

Artists respond to World Events

Panel Abstract

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Moderator:

Na-Rae Kim

Panelists:

Monica Ong
Quan Tran
Nay Saysourinho

(En)Visioning Violence

Many say that the pandemic made visible anti-Asian violence. But what does anti-Asian violence look like in the past and present? How have writers engaged in various forms of violence? And what are some of the violences that the writers face for how they are seen or what they create?

Three Asian American writers discuss how they see violence and art, and writing in a time of violence. What does it mean that they are seen as Asian American writers in our time? How do you write, and not write, as an Asian American, especially at this moment? 

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Moderator:

Frederick Douglas Knowles III

Panelists:

Beat #Lit…. creating Street Poetry

Panel Abstract

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Moderator:

Sergio Troncoso

Panelists:

Roya Hakakian
Okey Ndibe

Writing Across Borders: Writers discuss the history, heritage, and identity in writing across borders in the United States, as immigrants or the sons or daughters of immigrants.

We might think that one of the most important dialogues the writing world is having with itself – a dialogue surrounding the experiences of, opportunities available to, and creative output of immigrant writers –is a recent phenomenon. In truth, however, immigrant writers have been writing, exploring, and publishing on questions related to varied immigrant experiences for decades. Our writers – Roya Hakakian, author of the recently released A Beginner’s Guide to America; Okey Ndibe, author of Foreign Gods, Inc.; and [INSERT the THIRD PANELIST HERE] – themselves all from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and experiences, will discuss not only how their heritages and identities have collided with America, but also what that collision has meant for their work, careers, and relationships with their writing.